Activities

Considering potential lessons from the Covid-19 pandemic to strengthen the BTWC (Part 1 – virtual)

This expert seminar aims to consider and determine the key issues highlighted by the pandemic that could be relevant to the disarmament and non-proliferation scope of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC). The purpose is to explore the lessons that can be learned from this international public health crisis, and the response, that could […]

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This expert seminar aims to consider and determine the key issues highlighted by the pandemic that could be relevant to the disarmament and non-proliferation scope of the Biological and Toxin Weapons Convention (BTWC). The purpose is to explore the lessons that can be learned from this international public health crisis, and the response, that could have an impact on the Convention and help strengthen its implementation. The seminar will thus contribute to put into perspective questions that notably relate to national implementation and challenges to biosecurity stemming from advances in life sciences. Considering the scope of the Convention as well as the importance of developing interactions with other existing instruments, organisations and mechanisms, while respecting their respective mandates and avoiding duplication, it will also provide an opportunity to reconsider the reflections pertaining to the implementation of Article VII on emergency assistance in case of a violation of the Convention, and of Article X on cooperation and assistance.
Monday, 17 May 2021
10:00 – 10:15 Introduction and Welcoming Remarks
  • Elisande Nexon (Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique, France)
  • Mauri Pasanen (Disarmament, non-proliferation and arms export control, EEAS)
10:15 – 11:30 Session 1: Exploring the potential impact of the Covid-19 pandemic with regard to the implementation of the BTWC Chair: Una Jakob (Peace Research Institute Frankfurt, Germany) Speakers:
  • James Revill (United Nations Institute for Disarmament Research, Switzerland) - Current and future main challenges and perspectives for the BWC stemming from the pandemic
  • Filippa Lentzos (Kings College London, United Kingdom) - Global health, research and dual use dilemma in the Covid-19 perspective
  • Gunnar Jeremias (Hamburg University, Germany) - Potential impact of the pandemic on the BWC national implementation
  • Tatyana Novossiolova (Centre for the Study of Democracy, Bulgaria) - Cross-sectorial awareness raising and education challenges and perspectives in life sciences
Discussion 11:30 – 11:45 Break 11:45 – 13:00 Session 2: Revisiting the prospects of cooperation for peaceful purposes and emergency assistance through the potential lessons of the pandemic Chair: Elisande Nexon (Fondation pour la Recherche Stratégique, France) Speakers:
  • Jean Pascal Zanders (The Trench / FRS, France) - Exploring the issue of emergency assistance in the framework of the BWC (reconsidering the reflections carried out until the pandemic)
  • Alessandro Marcello (International Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Italy) – Promoting capacity building through cooperation and assistance, the example of the ICGEB
  • Anne-Sophie Lequarré (Service for Foreign Policy Instruments, stability and Peace, European Commission) - The contribution of EU CBRN Centres of Excellence to the COVID-19 response
  • Antoine Flahault (Institute of Global Health, Switzerland) - Strengthening preparedness and response to international biological public health emergencies
Discussion 13h00 Conclusion
  • Daniel Feakes (BTWC Implementation Support Unit, UNODA, Geneva Branch)

Addressing illicit SALW and ammunition in conflict affected areas – The role for peace support operations (virtual)

The proliferation of illicit weapons, especially small arms and light weapons (SALW) and their ammunition, continues to contribute to armed violence, crime and instability especially in conflict affected areas. The destabilizing accumulation, illicit transfer and misuse of conventional weapons and ammunition continue to initiate, sustain and exacerbate armed conflict. In addition, poorly-controlled weaponry and associated […]

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The proliferation of illicit weapons, especially small arms and light weapons (SALW) and their ammunition, continues to contribute to armed violence, crime and instability especially in conflict affected areas. The destabilizing accumulation, illicit transfer and misuse of conventional weapons and ammunition continue to initiate, sustain and exacerbate armed conflict. In addition, poorly-controlled weaponry and associated ammunition are impeding sustainable development and negatively impacting humanitarian assistance, often in the world’s most fragile societies. The UN Security Council—the primary organ of the United Nations responsible for the maintenance of international peace and security—remains actively seized of these cross-cutting challenges. It has addressed weapons-related issues across its agenda, from Security Sector Reform to arms embargoes to counter-terrorism and sustaining peace, while also treating these matters in country-specific and regionally-focused contexts. Weapons and ammunition management (WAM) has become an increasingly critical tool of the Security Council in this regard. In recent years, the United Nations has supported national authorities in WAM in places like Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti and Mali. The Secretary-General has acknowledged the criticality of weapons and ammunition management to “saving lives”, particularly in fragile and conflict-affected settings. In his Agenda for Disarmament, Securing Our Common Future, the Secretary-General acknowledges that the loss of arms and ammunition from storage sites, and their onward proliferation, can be a catalyst for armed violence, conflict and insecurity. Against this backdrop, the aim of this ad hoc webinar was to allow for an exchange of views and experiences of EU and UN peace operations in addressing illicit weapons, and to provide recommendations to develop further the arms control aspect in the design and mandate of EU and UN peace support operations.  
Monday, 14 December 2020
15:15 – 15:30 Introduction and Welcoming Remarks
  • Ambassador Marjolijn van Deelen, Special Envoy on Disarmament and Non-proliferation and Head of the EEAS Disarmament Non-proliferation and Arms Export Control Division, EU
  • Ms. Izumi Nakamitsu, Under-Secretary-General and High Representative for Disarmament Affairs, UN
  • Mr. Benjamin Hautecouverture, Senior research fellow, Fondation pour la recherche stratégique/EU Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Consortium
15:30 – 16:30 Session 1: The Legal and Political Environment Chair: Mr. Benjamin Hautecouverture, Senior research fellow, Fondation pour la recherche stratégique/EU Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Consortium Speakers:
  • Ms. Katherine Prizeman, UNODA
  • Mr. Jonah Leff, Conflict Armament Research
  • Mr. Eric Berman, former Director, Small Arms Survey
16:30 – 16:45 Break 16:45 – 18h00 Session 2: The Role of Peace Operations in Information Gathering, Tracing and Investigation Chair: Mr. Ntagahoraho Burihabwa, DPO, UN Speakers:
  • Savannah de Tessieres, UN consultant, former Coordinator of UN Libya Panel of Experts
  • David Lochhead, ex-DPKO MINUSMA, UNMISS and UNMIS; Small Arms Survey
  • ACOS CJ3 - OF5 Dionysios Mantadakis, EUNAVFOR MED IRINI, EU
 
Tuesday, 15 December 2020
15:30 – 16:45 Session 3: The Role of Peace Operations in Supporting Weapons and Ammunition Management Chair: Dr. Sylvain Paile-Calvo, Senior researcher, European Studies Unit, University of Liège Speakers:
  • Alexander Ralf Riebl, UNMAS
  • Nora Allgaier, DPO-ODA, UN
  • Hardy Giezendanner, UNIDIR
  • Lt Col (EL A) Odysseas Loukopoulos, C.2 - Crisis Response Planning and Current Operations, European External Action Service, EU
16:45 – 17:00 Break 17:00 – 18h15 Session 4: Weapons and Ammunition Management Policy and Practices in Peace Operations Chair: Mr. Michal Adamowicz, European External Action Service, EU Speakers:
  • Mr. Emile Le Brun, Small Arms Survey
  • Wing Commander Samatha Gomani, DPO-Office of Military Affairs, Policy and Doctrine Division, UN
  • Dr. Jovana Carapic, GICHD's Ammunition Management Advisory Team (AMAT)
  18:15 – 18:30 Concluding Remarks
  • Mr. Alexandre Zouev, Assistant Secretary-General for Rule of Law and Security Institutions, UN
  • Ms. Alison Weston, Head of Division - Partnerships and Agreements (SECDEFPOL.2), European External Action Service, EU
  • Mr. Benjamin Hautecouverture, Senior research fellow, Fondation pour la recherche stratégique/EU Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Consortium

Strengthening Non-proliferation and Disarmament Education in Europe (Part I – virtual)

On 23 and 24 June 2020, SIPRI, on behalf of the EUNPD Consortium, organised a virtual event on Strengthening Non-proliferation and Disarmament (NPD) Education in Europe. The inperson event originally planned to be held in Brussels will take place at a later date. The 47 participants included, for the first time, university-affiliated members of the […]

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On 23 and 24 June 2020, SIPRI, on behalf of the EUNPD Consortium, organised a virtual event on Strengthening Non-proliferation and Disarmament (NPD) Education in Europe. The inperson event originally planned to be held in Brussels will take place at a later date. The 47 participants included, for the first time, university-affiliated members of the EUNPD Network. The first session provided an overview of education activities by the Consortium, the Network and the United Nations. The second session focused on how to make NPD education relevant and engaging, with contributions from academics who drew on experiences in different disciplines. The third session discussed ways to adjust to current challenges by sharing lessons learned from online teaching as well as other platforms. In this context, PRIF presented the EUNPDC e-Learning tool. Given the sudden shift to online learning following the COVID outbreak, the event provided an extremely valuable forum for sharing good practices, including feedback from students on online teaching. The concluding roundtable session explored ideas to improve NPD education for Consortium and Network members. Suggestions included a gender focus given the continuing imbalance in NPD education; interdisciplinary initiatives; shared classrooms and mutual teaching at each other’s classes; joint summer schools; engagement with other regions; and stronger synergies between students and professionals, inter alia by reinforcing links between Network members involved in education activities and those who are not, as well as officials participating in the various Consortium activities. An overview of NPD education activities by Network members will be the subject of an EUNPD paper to be published after the summer.   [embeddoc url="http://www.nonproliferation.eu/wp-content/uploads/2020/09/EUNDPC-ad-hoc-seminar-on-NPD-eduction-agenda-16-June-2020-for-sendout.pdf" download="all" viewer="google"]

Security, Safety, Sustainability: Promoting Good Behaviour in Outer Space

Security, Safety, Sustainability: Promoting Good Behaviour in Outer Space Objective: Exchange of views and information on national, regional and global initiatives to promote the preservation of safe, secure and sustainable space environment and the peaceful use of outer space on an equitable and mutually acceptable basis, with a view to feed into a voluntary instrument […]

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Security, Safety, Sustainability: Promoting Good Behaviour in Outer Space Objective: Exchange of views and information on national, regional and global initiatives to promote the preservation of safe, secure and sustainable space environment and the peaceful use of outer space on an equitable and mutually acceptable basis, with a view to feed into a voluntary instrument to establish standards of responsible behaviour across the full range of space activities and related challenges.   08:45 – 09:00 Introduction and Welcoming Remarks Carine Claeys, Special Envoy for Space, European External Action Service Xavier Pasco, Director, Fondation pour la recherche stratégique, France   09:00 – 11:00 Session 1: The Legal and Political Environment Chair: Sergio Marchisio, Chairman, European Centre for Space Law Speakers: -              Nathalie Le Cam, policy and legal officer, Space Task Force, European External Action Service -              Andre João Rypl, Chair, UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, Brazil -              David Kuan-Wei Chen, Executive Director, McGill Centre for Research in Air and Space Law, Canada -              Daniel Porras, Space Security Fellow, UNIDIR   11:00 – 11:15 Coffee break   11:15 – 13:00 Session 2: National Policies and International Implications Chair: Petr Havlik, Space Policy Officer, Space Task Force, European External Action Service Speakers: -              Xavier Pasco, Director, Fondation pour la recherche stratégique, France -              Mariel Borowitz, Assistant Professor, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA -              Shang Zhen, Councellor and Legal Advisor, Mission of China to the EU   13:00 – 14:00 Lunch   14:15 – 16:15 Session 3: Knowledge and Monitoring of the Space Environment Chair: Jana Robinson, Space Security Program Director, The Prague Security Studies Institute Speakers: -              Sabine Lecrenier, HoU Space policy, European Commission -              Daniel Oltrogge, Director, Center for Space Standards and Innovation, Analytical Graphics, Inc., USA -              Christine Leurquin, VP, Institutional Relations, SES SA, Belgium -              Jean-François Bureau, Vice-President, Eutelsat, France   16:15 – 16:30 Coffee break   16:30 – 18:30 Session 4: Challenges and Opportunities for International Regulation Chair: Paul Wohrer, Research fellow, Fondation pour la recherche stratégique, France Speakers: -              Patricia Lewis, Research Director, Chatham House, UK -              Niklas Hedman, Chief, UNOOSA's Committee, Policy and Legal Affairs Section -              Regina Peldszus, Co-Chair, EU SST Consortium -              Jean-Jacques Tortora, Director, European Space Policy Institute, Austria -              Smita Jha, Senior Partner, Mazars, India   18:30 – 18:40 Concluding Remarks Benjamin Hautecouverture, Senior research fellow, Fondation pour la recherche stratégique, France Georgios Kritikos, Deputy Head of Disarmament, Non-Proliferation and Arms Control Division, European External Action Service

Mine Action Donor Strategies

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY   Mine Action Donor Strategies – Lessons for the Revision of the EU Guidelines for Mine Action   On 28 November 2018, the EU Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Consortium organized an Ad-Hoc Seminar on Mine Action Donor Strategies – Lessons for the Revision of the EU Guidelines for Mine Action, which was held at […]

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

 

Mine Action Donor Strategies – Lessons for the Revision of the EU Guidelines for Mine Action

  On 28 November 2018, the EU Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Consortium organized an Ad-Hoc Seminar on Mine Action Donor Strategies – Lessons for the Revision of the EU Guidelines for Mine Action, which was held at the Palais des Nations, Geneva, on the margins of the 17th Meeting of the States Parties to the Mine-Ban Convention (the Ottawa Convention). The event brought together nearly 60 participants from States Parties to the Convention, the UN (UNMAS), the EU (EEAS, Commission), and the main NGOs in the field of Mine action. The objective of this Ad-Hoc Seminar was to collect lessons learned, views and inputs regarding Mine action donor strategies, with a view to feed the revision of the EU guidelines for Mine action. The EU is one of the world's top donors. EU's assistance is still led by the "guidelines for Mine action" dating from 2008 and which has to be revised. As a result, seven main donor countries explained their Mine action strategies (the UK, Germany, the USA, the Netherlands, Japan, Switzerland, Norway) along with key donors at regional (the EU) and global (the UNMAS) levels. Thanks to Afghanistan, Angola, Bosnia & Herzegovina and Colombia, the participants were provided with accurate lessons learned from the ground. Significant messages were sent to donor countries and operators. And exchanges with some of the more relevant operators helped European officials fuel the reflexion about the revision of the EU guidelines.

Agenda

Tuesday, 27 November 2018

19:00 Welcome Dinner  

Wednesday, 28 November 2018

08:15 – 08:45 Registration & Welcome Coffee   08:45 – 09:00 Introduction and Welcoming Remarks Ahmad Helal Atmar, Afghan presidency of the 17th Meeting of States Parties to the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention Benjamin Hautecouverture, Senior research fellow, Fondation pour la recherche stratégique   09:00 – 11:00 Presentation of National Mine Action Donor Strategies Chair: Frank Meeussen, Policy officer, Disarmament, Non-Proliferation and Arms Export Control, SECPOL1, European External Action Service Speakers:
  • Elizabeth McGarva, Conflict, Humanitarian and Security Department, Department for International Development United Kingdom
  • Ingrid Schøyen, Humanitarian Affiars, Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • Oliver Bräuner, Desk Officer, Europe and Humanitarian Mine Action, Federal Foreign Office Germany
  • Steven Costner, Deputy Director, Office of Weapons Removal and Abatement, Bureau of Political-Military Affairs, Department of State USA
  • Koen Höcker, Directorate Stability & Humanitarian Aid, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, The Netherlands
  • Alessandro Palmoso, Programme Officer, Human Security Division of the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs, Switzerland
  • Jun Yamada, First Secretary, Defense Attaché, Delegation of Japan for the Conference on Disarmament, Geneva
  11:00 – 11:15 Coffee break   11:15 – 13:00 Regional and Global Mine Action Strategies Chair: Anne Kemppainen, Deputy Head, EU Delegation to the UN and other international organisations in Geneva Speakers:
  • Agnès Marcaillou, Director, UN Mine Action Service
  • Fotini Antonopoulou, Programme Manager in charge of Mine Action, Operations Section III, EU Delegation to Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Asa Massleberg, Advisor, Strategic Management, Geneva International Centre for Humanitarian Demining
  • Tomaž Lovrenčič, Director, ITF Enhancing Human Security
  13:00 – 15:00 Lunch   15:00 – 16:30 Donor strategies – perspectives from affected Countries Chair: Mohammad Shafiq Yosufi, Director, Directorate of Mine Action Coordination, Afghanistan National Disaster Management Authority Speakers:
  • Adriano Gonçalves, Head, Cabinet of International Cooperation and Assistance, Angola
  • Saša Obradović, Director, Bosnia and Herzegovina Mine Action Centre
  • Miguel Ceballos, High Commisioner for Peace, Colombia
  16:30– 16:45 Coffee break   16:45 – 18:30 Donor Strategies – perspectives from operators Chair: Hector Guerra, Director, International Campaign to Ban Landmines – Cluster Munition Coalition Speakers:
  • Tim Kreuk, Head, Halo Trust Europe office
  • Josephine Dresner, Country Representative, Mines Advisory Group
  • Emmanuel Sauvage, Director, Armed Violence Reduction Unit, Handicap International
  • Hans Risser, Head of Operations, NPA
  • Steve Priestley, Director, MA Programs, Janus Global operations LLC
  18:30 – 18:40 Concluding Remarks Benjamin Hautecouverture, Senior research fellow, Fondation pour la recherche stratégique Frank Meeussen, Policy officer, Disarmament, Non-Proliferation and Arms Export Control, SECPOL1, European External Action Service  

Palais des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland
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Man-portable air-defence systems (MANPADS)

Man-portable air-defence systems (MANPADS) On behalf of the EU Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Consortium, the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) organised an ad-hoc workshop in Brussels on 27 November on the diversion risks of man-portable air-defence systems (MANPADS), attended by approximately 55 government officials and non-governmental experts from Europe and elsewhere. Jacek Bylica, European External Action […]

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Man-portable air-defence systems (MANPADS)

On behalf of the EU Non-Proliferation and Disarmament Consortium, the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) organised an ad-hoc workshop in Brussels on 27 November on the diversion risks of man-portable air-defence systems (MANPADS), attended by approximately 55 government officials and non-governmental experts from Europe and elsewhere. Jacek Bylica, European External Action Service Special Envoy for Disarmament and Non-Proliferation, who had initiated the workshop, noted that MANPADs exemplify the interactive nature of the key threats identified in the European Agenda on Security: in this case, terrorism, organised crime and proliferation. The workshop addressed the level of risk, the level of awareness and the actions needed to alleviate risks. A technical session explained the history, design, components, use, and variations of MANPADS, more than one million of which have been produced in the last 50 years. Over the past decade, about 20,000 have been transferred, often with insufficient transparency. Some of these weapons can be used with little training and they can last for decades in the right climate conditions. Trade and diversion trends were explained, and the export controls that have introduced, including best practices promoted by the OSCE and the authorization system introduced by one company to prevent illicit use of its weapons. Briefings covered the situation in specific regions and conflict zones around the world, including northern Africa, the Levant, South America, eastern Africa, Southeast Asia, and Eastern Europe. While the situation in the Horn of Africa remains fraught, here are serious risks in Venezuela, where the unstable government has procured over 500 MANPADS launchers and dispersed them to 42 military units around the country, and in the Donbas region of Ukraine, where Russian-supported rebels have seized government stockpiles. Elsewhere, government secrecy is as much of a problem as capacity constraints in impeding the tracing of transfers.  

Agenda

Tuesday, 27 November 2018

08:45 – 09:00 Registration 09:00 – 09:15 Introductory remarks Jacek Bylica, Special Envoy for Disarmament and Non-proliferation, EEAS Mark Fitzpatrick, Director, Non-Proliferation and Nuclear Policy, IISS Part I: MANPADS global issues and responses These first two sessions will aim to address the following elements:
  • MANPADS basics:history, design, main components, use, variations
  • MANPADS lifecycle, durability and longevity
  • Expertise and training needed for effective operation.
  • Numbers produced
  • Trade and diversion trends
  • Export controls
  • Technical end-use control features
  • Principles and best practices
09:15 – 10:15 Session I a: Threat assessment, technical introduction, production, control features Speakers:
  • Ben Barry, Senior Fellow for Land Warfare, IISS
  • Tomasz Brodniewicz, Head of the Precise Ammunition Department, MESKO
10:15 – 11:00 Session I b: Trade, export controls and best practices Speakers:
  • Siemon Wezeman, Senior Researcher, Arms Transfers and Military Expenditure Programme, SIPRI
  • Robin Mossinkoff, Head FSC Support Section, Conflict Prevention Centre, OSCE
11:00 – 11:30 Coffee break Part II: Focus on specific regions and conflict zones In each of the following sessions we will seek, as best possible, to address:
  • Availability and use of MANPADS
  • Perceptions of threat
  • Actions undertaken to address the issue
  • Capacity of local governments and regional institutions to mitigate threat
  • Outside assistance needed
11:30 – 12:15 Session II a: Regional focus –North Africa Speakers:
  • Matt Schroeder, Senior Researcher, Small Arms Survey
  • David Diaz, Chief of Staff, Strategic Capacity Group
12:15 – 13:00 Session II b: Conflict zones – The Levant Speakers:
  • David Diaz, Chief of Staff, Strategic Capacity Group
  • Siemon Wezeman, Senior Researcher, Arms Transfers and Military Expenditure Programme, SIPRI
13:00 – 14:00 Lunch 14:00 – 14:45 Session II c: Regional focus – Southeast Asia Speaker:
  • Shang-Su Wu, Research Fellow, Military Studies Programme, Institute of Defence and Strategic Studies, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies
14:45 – 15:30 Session II d: Regional focus – South and Central America Speaker:
  • Andrei Serbin Pont, Research Director, La Coordinadora Regional de Investigaciones Económicas y Sociales (CRIES)
15:30 – 15:45 Coffee break 15:45 – 16:45 Session II e: Regional focus – East Africa Speakers:
  • Dr Nelson Alusala, Research consultant, Institute for Security Studies (ISS)
  • Claudio Gramizzi, Head of Regional Operations - West Africa, Conflict Armament Research
16:45– 17:30 Session II f: Regional focus – Eastern Europe (Ukraine) Speaker:
  • Dr Margarita Konaev,Non-Resident Fellow, Modern War Institute at West Point
17:30 – 17:45 Concluding remarks Jacek Bylica, Special Envoy for Disarmament and Non-proliferation, EEAS
Courtyard by Marriott, Avenue des Olympiades 6
Brussels, 1140 Belgium
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Cooperating to implement the Convention on Cluster Munitions

Landmines and cluster munitions’ survivors : A testimony by Khun Wiboonrat Chanchoo (Thailand) « It is a great honour for me to be here today. As all of you are aware, I’m not a cluster munitions survivor, but landmine survivor. For me, there is no difference between cluster munitions and landmine survivors or other remnants […]

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Landmines and cluster munitions’ survivors : A testimony by Khun Wiboonrat Chanchoo (Thailand)

« It is a great honour for me to be here today. As all of you are aware, I’m not a cluster munitions survivor, but landmine survivor. For me, there is no difference between cluster munitions and landmine survivors or other remnants of wars. We are the same. We are victims. I myself became person with disability nearly 20 years ago. That day, I went in to the forest near the Thai-Cambodian border to collect bamboo to bring home. I was not aware that there were landmines hidden in that area. All I well recalled was that all of a sudden there was loud noise and my body was catapulted into the air. When I looked at my left leg, I saw it was shattered with dangling fractured bones. I screamed to warn others not to come near while I crawled myself to safety. Though I did not lose my life, but life has changed dramatically after that. My husband by that time could not deal with it and felt ashamed of my physical condition so he abused me, abandoned me and left our family taking with him all the money and assets we had. But he left the most valuable assets for me, our two daughters. I have been sharing my story, which is of course not a pleasant one, several times. I am aware that sometimes people feel uncomfortable when listening. But I have to continue doing this because I would like people to really know the lives of survivors. It’s not like we received support one time and all have been done so that case can be closed. Not only survivors receive affect, but also our family members. There are too many people with disabilities who still have difficulties in their lives. Some of them are in worse conditions. They still need support. Some of them don’t even have rice on the table. After having accident, I did not give up, I continued working in the paddies and plots, growing rice and vegetables, and raising my two kids on my own. As time went on, I came to realise that a person with disability not only can live a normal life with the proper care and support from those around them; but they can also contribute meaningfully towards others. I decided to join a local support group for people with disabilities. It is a platform where we can work together to help improve our living conditions. Our self-help group started from small group of landmine survivors and people with disabilities in my village. The group expanded to neighbouring villages, and finally become a sub-district group. This group then connects with other survivors’ groups in other districts and provinces. My self-help group now comprises over 100 landmine survivors. Most recently, I have expanded the scope of my activities to include persons with various disabilities, orphans, children with HIV infected parents, and the abandoned elderly. Activities of our self-help groups in the past and at present include mushroom planting, micro-credit loan among group members, promotion of income generating activities, setting up a local network to deliver assistance is a much more efficient and sustainable approach in providing assistance, and more. Some activities become successful for example mushroom planting, but some are not successful including raising animals. After 20 years of being a person with disability, believe it or not, the needs of survivors I have been observing remain the same, which are very basic needs. Survivors need prostheses. Survivors need financial support and micro-credit. Survivors need to accessibility and modification of accommodation and public facilities for appropriate use by persons with disabilities. Survivors need to know about their rights. I would like to thank the Governments of Thailand for a lot of good work happening. My voices are louder. I would like also to thank other Governments including Lao PDR, Cambodia, Vietnam, and more for lots of good work happening in my survivors’ friends’ countries. We all know that government support and understanding for victims is vital to ensuring our full and equal participation in the society. I wish the international community continue working together to ensure that no one will have to suffer from this indiscriminate weapon ever again. I wish Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam acceding to the CCM very soon. We need protection of the rights of victims in an all-inclusive and sustainable manner. Aside from Government of Thailand, I would like to thank International Campaign to Ban Landmines-Cluster Munitions Coalition, Handicap International, Jesuit Refugee Services, COERR and Norwegian People’s Aid for supporting me all along. » Khun Wiboonrat Chanchoo, International Campaign to Ban Landmines - Cluster Munition Coalition, Thailand, 17 March 2017

The closed seminar on “Cooperating to implement the Convention on Cluster Munitions: the country coalition concept” was held in conjunction with the Permanent Representation of Germany to the Conference on Disarmament. It was funded by the European Union and jointly organised by the European External Action Service through the EU Non-proliferation Consortium, and the United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP).

It took place on the premises of the UNESCAP, Bangkok, Thailand, on March 16 and 17, 2017. The participants included both government officials, International organizations representatives and non-governmental experts from the South-East Asia region, the EU member states and beyond. The purpose of this seminar was to discuss future developments impacting the implementation of the Convention on Cluster Munitions (CCM). It focused on the concept of establishing “country coalitions” (i.e. with a country specific focus) as a means to enhance international cooperation and thus support the implementation of the Convention in South-East Asia. A coordinated approach concerning destruction and clearance (including mapping and securing of contaminated areas) of cluster munitions and assisting victims, involving donor states and operators will support States Parties to fulfil their commitments under the Convention. Lastly, a country specific approach is required to help ensure progress in implementation of the CCM. Against this backdrop the concept of establishing “country coalitions” as a means to enhance international cooperation and thus promote the CCM seems to have considerable potential. The South-East Asia region is the location of the heaviest cluster munition contamination globally. It includes both States Parties and Non-States Parties to the CCM, including countries who are addressing contamination, stockpile destruction, etc. Within the region, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia are all dealing with very high levels of contamination. Lao PDR has the highest levels of contamination. The seminar consisted of five sessions: Session 1 offered to all the countries of the region the opportunity to share their perception of the issue (risks and threats, entry into force and implementation of the CCM, etc.). Session 2 focused on cooperation and assistance by introducing the country coalition concept, discussing and refining this approach. The relevant actors for such a coalition would include representatives of: the affected country, donor states, international organizations, operators on the ground and other relevant experts, such as the GICHD. Session 3 addressed the issue of the cooperation and assistance by introducing the country coalition concept. Session 4 and 5 explored the practical implications of the country coalition concept on the challenge of article 4 obligations and on victim assistance.

Agenda

Thursday 16 March 2017

09:00 - 09:15 Welcome and Introduction – Setting the scene
Michael Biontino (Germany) Frank Meeussen (EEAS/EU) Benjamin Hautecouverture (France/EUNPC)
09:15 – 11:15 Session 1: Challenges of Cluster Munition Remnants contamination in the region
Chair & Introduction: Megan Burke (CMC) Cambodia Lao PDR Malaysia The Philippines Sri Lanka Thailand
11:15 – 11:30 Coffee Break
11:30 – 12:45 Session 2: Introducing the country coalition concept
Chair: Benjamin Hautecouverture (France/EUNPC) Speaker 1 Michael Biontino (Germany) Speaker 2 Megan Burke (CMC)
12:45 – 14:00 Lunch
14:30 – 16:30 Session 3: Cooperation and assistance - The connection between affected countries and donor countries – Best practices in coordination/cooperation
Chair: Frank Meeussen (EEAS/EU) Speaker 1 Genevieve Clune (Australia) Speaker 2 Khampheng Douangthongla (Lao PDR) Speaker 3 Vidya Abhayagunawardena (Sri Lanka Campaign to Ban Landmines)
18:30 – 21:00 Reception, German residence

Friday 17 March 2017

09:00 – 10:00 Session 4: Practical implications 1 - Victim assistance
Chair: Aksel Steen-Nilsen (NPA Programme Director, Cambodia) Speaker 1 JJuan Carlos Ruan (Ottawa ISU) Speaker 2 Sheila Mweemba (CCM-ISU) Speaker 3 Benoit Couturier (Handicap International Lao PDR)
10:00 – 11:00 Session 5: Practical implications 2 – Clearance
Chair: Maarten Broekhof (The Netherlands) Speaker 1 Maarten Broekhof (The Netherlands) Speaker 2 Touch Pheap (Cambodia) Speaker 3 Bounpheng Sisawath (Lao PDR)
11:00 – 11:15 Coffee Break
11:30 – 12:30 Wrap up and recommendations
Sandra de Waele (EU) Balasubramaniam Murali (UNDP – Lao PDR) Stefano Toscano (GICHD) Benjamin Hautecouverture (France/EUNPC)
12:30 – 13:30 Farewell lunch
United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, United Nations Conference Center , Meeting Room A - Rajadamnern Nok Avenue
Bangkok, Thaïlande
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Developments in SALW Technology and Design: Implications for Countering Diversion

The EU Non-proliferation Consortium organised a one-day expert seminar on “Developments in SALW-technology: implications for countering diversion”, on 7 March 2017 in Brussels. Preventing diversion of Small Arms and Light Weapons (SALW) is a key priority for the international community in preventing violent conflicts and gun enabled crimes. The seminar included presentations and discussions on […]

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The EU Non-proliferation Consortium organised a one-day expert seminar on “Developments in SALW-technology: implications for countering diversion”, on 7 March 2017 in Brussels.

Preventing diversion of Small Arms and Light Weapons (SALW) is a key priority for the international community in preventing violent conflicts and gun enabled crimes. The seminar included presentations and discussions on ‘Risks of diversion’, ‘Marking and tracing’, ‘Stockpile management’ and ‘End-use controls’. It built upon the outcomes of the 2015 Meeting of Governmental Experts on the Implementation of the UN Programme of Action on SALW. The discussions will feed into the review of the EU SALW Strategy as well as preparations for the 2018 Review Conference of the UN Programme of Action on SALW. The seminar brought together 40 participants from European industry, EU and EU member state officials, regional and international organizations, and research institutes.

Agenda

09:00–09:15 Welcome and introduction to the seminar
Pawel Herczynski, Director Security Policy and Conflict Prevention, European External Action Service Mark Bromley, Co-Director of the Dual-use and Arms Trade Programme, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute
09:15–10:30 Session 1 — Diversion: causes, consequences and risk mitigation
Chair: Frank Meeussen, Alternate Chair of COARM Council Working Party, European External Action Service Speaker: Savannah de Tessières, Senior Consultant, Small Arms Survey and United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations Speaker: Tarmo Dix, Desk Officer Conventional Arms Control, German Federal Foreign Office Speaker: N. R. Jenzen-Jones, Director, Armament Research Services This session will explore the legal and normative standards to prevent diversion; recent cases of diversion following exports of SALW from Europe; and means to counter diversion, including the opportunities and challenges generated by emerging SALW technologies and designs. Key questions that will be addressed
  • What were some of the most notable cases of SALW diversion in the past five years?
  • What were the main causes and consequences of these cases?
  • What legal and normative standards are in place to prevent SALW diversion?
  • What are the key gaps and weaknesses in these standards and their implementation?
  • What role have new technologies and designs played in recent cases of SALW diversion?
  • What role can new methods for marking, tagging and enabling/disabling SALW play in preventing cases of diversion?
10:45–12:00 Session 2 — Developments in SALW technology and design: implications for marking and tracing
Chair: Lina Grip, Researcher, Stockholm International Peace Research Institute Speaker: Dr. Giacomo Persi Paoli, Research Leader, RAND Europe Speaker: Thierry Jacobs, Strategic Projects and Relations Executive, Fabrique Nationale d’Herstal Speaker: Dr. Gernot Schrems, Laser Expert, Trotec Laser GmbH This session will explore the current state of the art with regard to available technologies for marking and tracing SALW and related ammunition; the challenges and opportunities posed by developments in modular design, polymer materials and additive manufacturing and how they can be met; and options for states to promote the use of new marking techniques. Key questions that will be addressed
  • What systems are in place for establishing harmonized standards for the marking and tracing of SALW?
  • What are the key gaps in these systems, and what challenges do they face?
  • What are the particular challenges posed by modular design, polymer materials and additive manufacturing for marking and tracing SALW?
  • What systems are companies developing for overcoming these challenges?
  • What are the particular challenges involved in developing effective systems for marking and tracing SALW ammunition?
  • What systems are companies developing for overcoming these challenges?
13:15–14:30 Session 3 — Developments in SALW technology and design: implications for stockpile management
Chair: Pilar Reina, Independent consultant Speaker: Alain Lapon, Chief Technical Officer, South Eastern and Eastern European Clearinghouse for the Control of Small Arms and Light Weapons Speaker: Diman Dimov, Project Support Office, Conflict Prevention Centre, Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe Speaker: Robert Kondor, Regional Sales Director, Dynamit Nobel Defence This session will explore the current state of the art with regard to available technologies for tagging and tracking SALW shipments and stockpiles to facilitate secure stockpile management; the role these systems can play in preventing SALW diversion; and options for states to promote the use of these technologies. Key questions that will be addressed
  • What systems are in place for establishing improved standards in SALW physical security and stockpile management?
  • What are the key gaps in these systems and what are the implementation challenges do states and other stakeholders face?
  • What are the key lessons-learned from recent efforts to improve SALW physical security and stockpile management in Europe and elsewhere?
  • What role can different types of technologies play in improving SALW physical security and stockpile management?
  • What new systems are companies developing for helping to tag and track SALW?
  • What role can these systems play in helping to improve SALW physical security and stockpile management standards and prevent cases of diversion?
14:30–15:45 Session 4 — Developments in SALW technology and design: implications for end-use controls
Chair: Elvan Isikozlu, Researcher, Bonn International Center for Conversion Speaker: Matt Schroeder, Senior Researcher, Small Arms Survey Speaker: Dr. Georg Jahnen, Head of Development, Armatix This session will explore the current state of the art with regard to available technologies for enabling and/or disabling SALW; other technologies that can help to prevent the post shipment diversion of SALW; and options for states to promote the use of these technologies. Key questions that will be addressed
  • Where have technologies for enabling and/or disabling SALW been used to help prevent or respond to cases of diversion?
  • What potential is there for the wider use of these systems?
  • What are the economic, functional and political barriers?
  • What systems have companies developed for ensuring that SALW can only be operated by authorized end-users?
  • What are some of the potential applications of these systems?
15:45–16:00 Summary of the day’s discussions and links with EU and UN-level processes
Frank Meeussen, alternate chair of COARM Council Working Party, European External Action Service Dr. Ali Arbia, Project Manager, Small Arms Survey
Conference Centre Albert Borschette (CCAB), 36 rue Froissart
Brussels, B- 1040
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EU – Republic of Korea Non-Proliferation Seminar on the nuclear and ballistic dimensions of the DPRK crisis

The European Union and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Korea co-sponsored a seminar on the nuclear and ballistic missile dimensions of the DPRK crisis, which took place in Seoul on 24-25 October 2016. The seminar was co-hosted by the EU Non-Proliferation Consortium (EUNPC), the Institute of Foreign Affairs and National Security […]

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The European Union and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Korea co-sponsored a seminar on the nuclear and ballistic missile dimensions of the DPRK crisis, which took place in Seoul on 24-25 October 2016. The seminar was co-hosted by the EU Non-Proliferation Consortium (EUNPC), the Institute of Foreign Affairs and National Security (IFANS), the Korea National Diplomatic Academy (KNDA) and the Korea Nuclear Policy Society (KNPS).

The seminar brought together some 60 participants from governments and think-tanks in Europe, North-East Asia and the United States. Participants shared their assessment of the DPRK nuclear and ballistic programmes, reiterating their grave concern about the threat that this programme constitutes to regional and international stability. Participants also shared their views on how the international community, including the EU, should best respond to the persistent violation by the DPRK of multiple UN Security Council Resolutions. They discussed in particular the effectiveness of a diplomatic response, including sanctions, as well as counter-proliferation solutions and options. Participants agreed that the seminar had provided a very useful opportunity for sharing views and assessments. They expressed the hope that the dialogue and exchange on this issue would continue, including in the framework of the bilateral relations between the EU and the Republic of Korea.

Agenda

Monday 24 October 2016

Welcome and introduction
09:30 - 09:45 Welcome and Introduction to the meeting
SHIN Dong-ik, President, IFANS, ROK Ambassador Gerhard Sabathil, Head of EU Delegation in the Republic of Korea, EU Benjamin Hautecouverture, Senior research fellow, Fondation pour la recherche stratégique (FRS), France
09:45 - 11:50 Session 1: The DPRK nuclear and ballistic programmes: what assessment?
12:30 - 13:00 Keynote speech
Session 2: The international community’s response: approaches and effectiveness
13:00 - 14:30 The diplomatic answer (including the sanctions)
14:50 - 16:20 The counter-proliferation solutions and options
Session 3: What more can be done or how different?
16:40 - 18:40 Leverage and new room for action

Thursday 25 October 2016

Session 4: Summary and Recommendations
09:00 - 11:00 A specific role for the EU?
11:20- 12:20 Wrap-up and Recommendations
Closing of the meeting
12:20 - 12:35 SHIN Dong-ik, President, IFANS, ROK Bruno Hanses, Senior Expert Disarmament, non-proliferation and arms export control, European External Action Service, EU Benjamin Hautecouverture, FRS, France
Seoul,

Preparing for the 2015 NPT Review Conference

International seminar © FRS Hosted by the Algerian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and supported by the European Union Co-organized by The Algerian Institut Diplomatique et des Relations Internationales and the EU Non-Proliferation Consortium/Fondation pour la recherche stratégique Sheraton Hotel, Algiers, 8-9 April 2015 An international seminar on “Preparing for the 2015 NPT Review Conference,” (RevCon) […]

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International seminar

[caption id="attachment_6133" align="alignleft" width="318"] © FRS Hosted by the Algerian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and supported by the European Union Co-organized by The Algerian Institut Diplomatique et des Relations Internationales and the EU Non-Proliferation Consortium/Fondation pour la recherche stratégique Sheraton Hotel, Algiers, 8-9 April 2015[/caption]

An international seminar on “Preparing for the 2015 NPT Review Conference,” (RevCon) co-organized by the Algerian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MFA) and the EU Non-Proliferation Consortium (EUNPC - Fondation pour la recherche stratégique, Paris, France), was held at the Sheraton hotel, near Algiers (Algeria), on 8 and 9 April 2015. The event was supported by the EU.

About 50 people attended the seminar: over 20 countries were represented, many at the ambassadorial levels. The ONUDA and the IAEA were represented. The president of the 2015 Revcon was present, along with the chairs of the three main committees of the Revcon. Five experts from the EUNPC and one nongovernmental expert from the Middle East gave presentations and/or moderated sessions. It was recognized that the 2015 NPT RevCon would be difficult because of inadequate implementation of the 2010 action plan. Yet the interim deal between Iran and the E3+3/EU (the Lausanne agreement) was perceived as an opportunity to create a positive atmosphere because it strengthens the NPT and shows that nonproliferation tools work. The cornerstone of the EU non-proliferation strategy (“effective multilateralism”) was recalled and its approach to the 2015 Revcon was detailed. Most of the challenges facing the RevCon were developed during session I (“Challenges and opportunities for the 2015 NPT Review Conference”). Session II (“Achieving progress on nuclear disarmament, including new approaches”) was marked by constructive propositions. It was stated that peaceful uses of nuclear energy (Session III) are crucial for social and economic development. Contribution of the Nuclear Weapon Free Zones to Non-Proliferation and Disarmament was detailed in Session IV. The success of the Nuclear Free Zones (NFZ) as a cross-cutting tool and issue for the NPT regime was recognized by the participants. Lastly, session V dealt with various aspects concerning the reinforcement of the NPT Review Process: institutional, procedural, substantive.

Agenda

Wednesday, April 8th 2015

9h00 - 9h45 Opening Session
Statement by Representative of Algeria Statement by Ambassador Jacek Bylica, Special Envoy EEAS, EU Statement by Representative of UN Office of Disarmament Affairs
9h45 - 10h00 Coffee break
10h00-11h30 Session I - Challenges and opportunities for the 2015 NPT Review Conference
Moderator: Representative of Algeria Panel: Representative of UK Mr. Ayman Khalil, Director, ACSIS, Jordan Representative of Algeria
11h30 - 11h45 Coffee break
11h45 - 13h00 Session II – Nuclear disarmament
Moderator: Bruno Tertrais, Senior Research Fellow, FRS, France Panel: Representative of Algeria Representative of Japan Ambassador Enrique-Roman Moray, President of Main Committee I Mr. Mark Fitzpatrick, IISS, EUNPC
13h00 - 14h30 Lunch
14h30 - 16h00 Session III - Peaceful uses of nuclear energy
Moderator: Mr. Benjamín Hautecouverture, Senior Research Fellow, FRS, France Panel: Representative of Iran Ambassador David Stuart, President of Main Committee III Representative of the IAEA Mr. Vitaly Fedchenko, SIPRI, Sweden
16h00 - 16h15 Coffee break
16h15 - 18h15 Session IV - Contribution of the Nuclear Weapon Free Zones to Non-Proliferation and Disarmament
Moderator: Representative of Egypt Panel: Representative of South Africa Representative of Mexico Ambassador Cristian Istrate, President of Main Committee II Representative of Finland
18h30 Welcome reception

Thursday, April 9th 2015

10h00 - 11h30 Session V: Strengthening the NPT Review Process
Moderator: Representative of Algeria Panel: Representative of Cuba Representative of UN Office of Disarmament Affairs Mr. Benjamin Hautecouverture, Senior Research Fellow, FRS, France
11h30-12h00 Closing session
Ambassador Jacek Bylica, Special Envoy EEAS, EU Ambassador Taous Feroukhi of Algeria, the President-designate of the 2015 NPT Review Conference Mr. Mark Fitzpatrick, Director, IISS Non-proliferation and Disarmament Programme / Vice-Chairman, EUNPC
Algiers,

European Forum Alpbach, Austria – “Nuclear Futures?”

EU-organised retreat assesses future of nuclear power and related non-proliferation issues. At an EU retreat in Alpbach, Austria on 23-25 August, three dozen experts from academia, industry and international organisations assessed future developments impacting the peaceful use of nuclear energy. Held in conjunction with the European Forum Alpbach, the seminar on ‘Nuclear Futures?’ concluded that […]

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EU-organised retreat assesses future of nuclear power and related non-proliferation issues.

At an EU retreat in Alpbach, Austria on 23-25 August, three dozen experts from academia, industry and international organisations assessed future developments impacting the peaceful use of nuclear energy. Held in conjunction with the European Forum Alpbach, the seminar on ‘Nuclear Futures?’ concluded that nuclear power will continue to be a significant part of the global energy panorama, particularly in non-OECD Asia. Nuclear energy can help ensure energy security and meet rising energy demands and greenhouse gas emission targets. While renewable sources will make an increasingly larger contribution, particularly if a way can be found to store solar and wind energy, technological advancements may also help overcome the serious problems associated with nuclear power. Indeed, how to ensure that nuclear power is provided safely, securely and without abetting nuclear-weapons programmes was the dominant theme of the event. Each aspect of the ‘3S’ framework – safeguards, safety and security – was discussed at length, as well as the role of export controls in ensuring the proper use of nuclear-related trade. Following the 2.5-day retreat, several of the participants led a public break-out session at the Alpbach Political Symposium to present an overview of nuclear energy forecasts and the challenges it entails. Three separate units of the European Union joined forces in funding and organising the seminar: the European External Action Service through the EU Non-proliferation Consortium, the Development and Cooperation – EuropeAid Directorate-General (DEVCO) of the European Commission, and the Commission’s Joint Research Center (JRC). Administrative arrangements were handled by the German Federal Office of Economics and Export Control (BAFA) through its DEVCO-funded program on ‘EU-Outreach in Export Control of Dual-Use Items‘.

Documents

Alpbach, Austria,

EU Consortium Middle East Workshop

Capacity-building Workshop for mid-level Diplomats in support of the Helsinki Conference on a Middle East WMD Free Zone In 2011 and 2012, the EU Non-Proliferation Consortium organised two international seminars in support of a process aimed at establishing a Zone Free of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMDFZ) in the Middle East. The 2011 and 2012 […]

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Capacity-building Workshop for mid-level Diplomats in support of the Helsinki Conference on a Middle East WMD Free Zone

In 2011 and 2012, the EU Non-Proliferation Consortium organised two international seminars in support of a process aimed at establishing a Zone Free of Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMDFZ) in the Middle East. The 2011 and 2012 seminars proved successful in bringing parties together and exploring key issues. The EU decided to sponsor a related event in 2014 as a practical contribution to the Helsinki Conference. Organised by our Consortium, a capacity-building workshop was held on the 18th and 19th June 2014 in Brussels, bringing together mid-level diplomats from the region for presentations on zones elsewhere and building blocks of multilateral diplomacy, along with a simulation exercise.

Agenda

Report

Interactive briefings

Documents

Crowne Plaza, Le Palace, Rue Gineste 3
Brussels, B-1210
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Enhancing compliance of the BTWC

[embeddoc url="https://www.nonproliferation.eu//wp-content/uploads/2018/10/workshop-report.pdf" download="all" viewer="google"]
Brussels – Belgium,

EU Support of the Arms Trade Treaty Negotiations

Council Decision 2013/43/CFSP, adopted on the 22nd January 2013, tasks the EU Non-Proliferation Consortium with the organization of two closed seminars bringing together 30 to 40 governmental experts in order to facilitate the successful completion of negotiation of an ATT at the March 2013 UN Conference, on the basis of the draft Treaty text of 26th July […]

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Council Decision 2013/43/CFSP, adopted on the 22nd January 2013, tasks the EU Non-Proliferation Consortium with the organization of two closed seminars bringing together 30 to 40 governmental experts in order to facilitate the successful completion of negotiation of an ATT at the March 2013 UN Conference, on the basis of the draft Treaty text of 26th July 2012, to identify the means of bringing the Treaty swiftly into force, the best practices at both national and regional level, and the facets of international assistance with the Treaty’s implementation. The EU has encouraged the ATT negotiation process since 2006 and two decisions have previously been adopted, in 2009 and 2010, in support of the on-going process.

Seminar 1

Divonne-les-Bains, Geneva Region, 28 February – 1 March 2013

Seminar 2

Geneva, 17 – 18 June 2013

Draft Treaty

The draft of the Arms Trade Treaty, United Nations Conference on the Arms Trade Treaty, New York, 2-27 July 2012, July 26, 2012

EU Documents

Publications of the Consortium

  • Arms Trade Treaty assistance: identifying a role for the European Union, Mark Bromley and Paul Holtom, Non-Proliferation Discussion Paper, February 2014, 18p.
  • The European Union's Involvement In Negotiating an Arms Trade Treaty, Sara Depauw, Non-Proliferation paper, No.23, December 2012, 16p.

Latest Publications from the Network

  • Arms Trade Treaty: What prospects for 2013 after the failure of negotiations in July 2012?, Virginie Moreau, Note d'analyse, (in French) Group for research and information on peace and security – GRIP, December 3, 2012, 12p.
  • Measuring International Arms Transfers, Paul Holtom, Mark Bromley, Verena Simmel, SIPRI Fact Sheet, December 2012, 8p., Stockholm International Peace Research Institute
  • Arms Trade Treaty: EU priorities before March 2013 negotiations, Cédric Poitevin, Note d'analyse, Group for research and information on peace and security - GRIP, November 28, 2012, 4p.
  • Implementing an Arms Trade Treaty: mapping assistance to strengthen arms transfer controls, Paul Holtom, Mark Bromley, SIPRI Insights on Peace and Security, No. 2012/2 July 2012, 20p., Stockholm International Peace Research Institute
  • Un traité pour réguler les transferts d'armes : défis et opportunités, (in French), M.Finaud, GCSP Web Editorial, 26 June 2012
  • A Treaty to Regulate Arms Transfers: Challenges and Opportunities, M.Finaud, GCSP Web Editorial, 25 June 2012
  • The arms trade treaty. Challenges for 2012 (in French), Virginie Moreau, GRIP Rapport n° 2011/6, 37 pp.
  • Technology transfers and the Arms Trade Treaty - Issues and Perspectives, Bruno Gruselle, Perrine Le Meur, in Recherches & Documents, No 2/2012, March 2012, 28p.
  • Towards the 2012 Arms Trade Treaty Negotiation Conference, Wilton Park Conference, Conference report for WP1136, 6p., November 2011
  • Import Controls and an Arms Trade Treaty, Mark Bromley and Paul Holtom, SIPRI Background Paper, July 2011
  • Implementing an arms trade treaty: Lessons on Reporting and Monitoring from Existing Mechanisms, Paul Holtom and Mark Bromley, SIPRI Policy Paper No. 28, July 2011
  • Transit and Trans-Shipment Controls in an Arms Trade Treaty, Paul Holtom and Mark Bromley , SIPRI Background Paper, July 2011
  • Arms transfers to Zimbabwe: implications for an arms trade treaty, Lukas Jeuck, SIPRI Background Paper, 12 pp., March 2011
Divonne-les-Bains, Geneva Region,

EU Consortium Middle East international seminars

First EU Consortium Middle East Seminar (July 2011) Seminar Background Papers The dynamics of missile proliferation in the Middle East and North Africa by Stéphane Delory Nuclear capabilities in the Middle East by Mark Fitzpatrick Peaceful uses of nuclear energy in the Middle East: multilateral approaches by Giorgio Franceschini and Daniel Müller A Zone free […]

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First EU Consortium Middle East Seminar (July 2011)

Seminar Background Papers

Other Documents

 

Second EU Consortium Middle East Seminar (November 2012)

Seminar Background Papers

Other Documents

Seminar Agenda

Monday, 5 November, 2012

09:00 – 10:00 Accreditation, Coffee
10:00 – 10:15 Welcome
10:15 – 12:00

Plenary Session I: Parameters and Properties of a Zone free of WMD in the Middle East and Basic Principles for a Regional Security Architecture

10:15 – 11:00 Presentations 11:00 – 12:00 General Discussion
12:00 – 14:00 Lunch
14:00 – 15:30

Breakout Sessions I: Confidence Building and Technical Measures in the Area of WMD and Means of Delivery

Nuclear Confidence Building and Technical Measures
14:00 – 14:30 Presentations 14:30 – 15:30 Discussion
Biological and Chemical Confidence Building and Technical Measures
14:00 – 14:30 Presentations 14:30 – 15:30 Discussion
Missiles and Other Means of Delivery
14:00 – 14:30 Presentations 14:30 – 15:30 Discussion
15:30 – 16:00 Coffee
16:00 – 17:30

Breakout Sessions II: Confidence Building Measures Improving Regional Peace and Security

Improving the Regional Security Architecture and Other Confidence Building Measures
16:00 – 16:30 Presentations 16:30 – 17:30 Discussion
Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy, Nuclear Safety and Security
16:00 – 16:30 Presentations 16:30 – 17:30 Discussion
19:00 Cocktail
20:00 Dinner, Keynote Speech

Tuesday, 6 November, 2012

09:00 – 10:30

Plenary Session II: Assessing Confidence Building Measures within a Process Leading up to the Establishment of a MEWMDFZ

09:00 – 09:30 Presentations 09:30 – 10:30 General Discussion10:30 – 11:00Coffee11:00 – 12:40

Plenary Session III: Report of the Chairs of the Breakout Sessions - Gauging Common Ground

11:00 – 11:40 Report of the Chairs 11:40 – 12:40 General Discussion12:40 – 13:00Conclusion & Farewell13:00 – 14:00Lunch  
Brussels – Belgium,