Asia outreach seminar on HCoC

27 November 2013

On 27 November 2013, the FRS organised, on behalf of the European Union, a regional outreach seminar to raise awareness of ballistic missile proliferation and encourage discussions on perspectives to better address the ballistic missile proliferation threat at a regional level. This event was held at the Park Royal Hotel in Singapore.

AGENDA

WELCOMING REMARKS

  • Dr. Jean-François DAGUZAN, Deputy Director, Foundation for Strategic Research
  • H.E. Dr. Michael PULCH, Head of Delegation, Delegation of the E.U. to Singapore
  • Richard BITZINGER, Senior Fellow, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies

 

ROUND TABLE I: ASSESSING THE CURRENT & FUTURE TECHNOLOGICAL TRENDS IN BALLISTIC-MISSILE PROLIFERATION IN ASIA

  • Asra HASSAN, Research Fellow, South Asian Strategic Stability Institute
  • Dr. Xavier PASCO, Senior Research Fellow, Foundation for Strategic Research (FRS)

KEY ISSUES: 

  • Developments in ballistic-missile technology
  • The relationship between space-launch and ballistic-missile technologies

 

ROUND TABLE II: REGIONAL PROLIFERATION ISSUES

  • Animesh ROUL, Executive Director, Society for the Study of Peace and Conflict
  • Dr. Kim Kyoung SOO, Professor, Myongji University

KEY ISSUES: 

  • The current regional state of play in the ballistic-missile field
  • Issues and challenges arising from this context

 

ROUND TABLE III: THE HCoC AGAINST THE PROLIFERATION OF BALLISTIC MISSILES: UNIVERSALITY & VISIBILITY 

  • Zentaro NAGANUMA, Director for Export Control Cooperation, Disarmament, Non-Proliferation and Science Department, Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs
  • Dr. Kazuto SUZUKI, Professor of International Political Economy, School of Public Policy, Hokkaido University

KEY ISSUES:

  • Presentation by current HCoC Chair of progress and challenges relating to universality and visibility
  • The role of the Code in regional dynamics

 

ROUND TABLE IV: SUCCESSFULLY IMPLEMENTING THE HCoC

  • Jérémie HAMMEDI, Missile and Space Issues Expert, European External Action Service (EEAS)
  • Dr. Rajeswari RAJAGOPALAN, Senior Fellow, Observer Research Foundation

 

KEY ISSUES: 

  • The EU Strategy to combat the proliferation of WMD delivery systems
  • Discussion of the Lahore Agreement and how such a measure might be adapted/brought into line with HCoC
  • Possible means of improving and developing the Code

 

CONCLUDING REMARKS 

  • Dr. Xavier PASCO, Senior Research Fellow, Foundation for Strategic Research (FRS)
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