Awareness-building session on HCoC in Prague

4 June 2014

On 4 June 2014, the FRS organised, on behalf of the European Union, an awareness-building session in Prague about dual-use technology and knowledge transfer issues in order to prevent them in the field of ballistic missiles. The session allowed considering both trends in the technology transfer for ballistic missiles and what could be promoted to prevent it at an early stage. This workshop gathered experts from scientific, space and industry communities of HCoC subscribing and non-subscribing States.

AGENDA

WELCOMING REMARKS

  • Alexandre HOUDAYER, Secretary General, Foundation for Strategic Research (FRS)

 

I/ HCoC & TECHNOLOGY ISSUES 

  • Dr. Xavier PASCO, Senior Research Fellow, Foundation for Strategic Research (FRS)
  • Dr. Serge PLATTARD, Resident Fellow, European Space Policy Institute (ESPI)

 

II/ PERSPECTIVES ON PROLIFERATION CONTROLES OF HIGH-TECH PRODUCTS IN TE LAUNCHER & MISSILES FIELS 

  • H.E. Carlo TREZZA, Chairman, Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR)
  • Dominique GUILLAUME, Chief Export Control Officer, Airbus Defence and Space

 

III/ ISSUES AND INSTRUMENTS IN THE CONTEXT OF NON-PROLIFERATION & THE NATURE OF TECHNOLOGY CONTROL REGIMES

  • Dr. Jan WOUTERS, Director, Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies
  • Roger ROBINSON, Chairman and Co-founder, Prague Security Studies Institute (PSSI)

 

WRAP-UP SESSION: HCoC & NON-PROLIFERATION EFFORTS

Research Papers

Harnessing Transparency Potential for Missile Non-Proliferation

Information is key for non-proliferation efforts. But the times when information was the exclusive purview of governments are over. Affordable, commercial and open-source monitoring capabilities empower states and societies alike, while challenging the ability of governments to preserve secrecy. Technological democratisation means that information is practically becoming a public good. And it allows for unprecedented transparency.

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Issue Briefs

The HCoC and Southeast Asian States

Only three out of ten Southeast Asian states have joined the HCoC to date (the Philippines, Cambodia and Singapore). This limited rate is noteworthy as Southeast Asia is increasingly concerned by the ongoing ballistic missile competition in broader Asia. Moreover, the region is actively investing to benefit from space technologies.

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Research Papers

Limiting the proliferation of WMD means of delivery: a low-profile approach to bypass diplomatic deadlocks

Since the creation of the HCoC in 2002, the need for more collective commitment and action to fight the proliferation of ballistic missiles has certainly not decreased. The destabilizing nature of these weapons has not changed. Non-proliferation is just less about keeping the world stable and more about not adding a risk factor to an uncertain future. The HCoC was and remains a response to that need, but certainly not the end of the quest for improvement.

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